Hito Steyerl & takeSomeCrime Dance Workshop

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Hito Steyerl, "Factory of the Sun", 2015. Single channel HD video, environment. 21 minutes. Installation view at MOCA Grand Avenue, 2016. Image courtesy of the Artist, MOCA, Los Angeles and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York. Photo:  Justin Lubliner

Hito Steyerl, "Factory of the Sun", 2015. Single channel HD video, environment. 21 minutes. Installation view at MOCA Grand Avenue, 2016. Image courtesy of the Artist, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York. Photo: Justin Lubliner 

Hito Steyerl & takeSomeCrime Dance Workshop: How I learned to stop worrying and dance in front of strangers on the internet for no reason at all

Join Hito Steyerl and takeSomeCrime to learn more about their collaboration in Factory of the Sun and participate in a dance workshop for aspiring dancers, artists and anyone who is merely curious. takeSomeCrime will share some of the basic moves that make dancing look so hard, but in reality are very simple to execute. He will share his story of how he went from dancing in his basement to posting videos on YouTube, choreographing commercials in Mexico and working on art projects in Germany.

Contemporary artist Hito Steyerl’s immersive video installation Factory of the Sun, which debuted at the 2015 German Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, featured YouTube dancer takeSomeCrime dancing in a basement in Edmonton. Factory of the Sun intersperses digital streams of information with internet dance footage as a playful mode of resistance by the video’s protagonists, in response to global economic and supremacist political forces.

Space is limited, please register by emailing walter_phillips_gallery@banffcentre.ca. Please wear comfortable clothing and footwear, suitable for movement and dancing. 

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 Hito Steyerl (b. 1966) lives and works in Berlin. Steyerl’s prolific filmmaking and writing occupies a highly discursive position between the fields of art, philosophy and politics, constituting a deep exploration of late capitalism’s social, cultural and financial imaginaries. Her films and lectures have increasingly addressed the presentational context of art, while her writing has circulated widely through publication in both academic and art journals, often online.

She has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2016); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain; Artists Space, New York; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2015); Van Abbemuseum, Eidenhoven, The Netherlands; ICA, London, UK; Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Germany (2014); Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2013); the Art Institute of Chicago; E-flux, New York (2012); Chisenhale Gallery, London, UK (2010); Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (2009); and Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2008). Group exhibitions include the German Pavilion, 56th Venice Biennal, Venice, Italy; the Hannover Kunstverein, Hannover, Germany; CAC Vilnius, Vilnius, Lithuania (2015); Cut to Swipe, Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Darknet, Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Switzerland; Bienal de la Imagen en Movimento, Goethe- Institut Buenos Aires, Argentina (2014); The Way of the Shovel: Art as Archeology, MCA Chicago; Nine Artists, Walker Art Centre, Minneapolis; Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Bergen Triennial, Bergen, Norway; Venice Biennale (2013); Taipei Biennial; Gwangju Biennial (2010); documenta 12, Kassel (2007) and Manifesta 5, San Sebastian (2004).

Forsythe, AKA takeSomeCrime, started dancing in his basement in 2007 as a way to relieve stress from his studies in university. After posting several videos on YouTube, one of them became a viral hit.  Having been influenced by 1930's style Charleston dance, 20th century Electronic dance, and 1980's breakdance, he blended together a style that has now lead to a sort of renaissance of swing: the "electro-swing" era. Music from the 40's, remixed with drum-and-bass from today have fused together to make an entirely new genre of music and dance. Forsythe found himself at the cusp of this movement. Now Forsythe continues to dance, teach and choreograph all over the world. He continues to experiment with genres and styles and he still posts to YouTube on a weekly basis.